200 Fremont

Las Vegas, NV



Fremont Hotel & Casino

1956 to now

Fremont Hotel  Las Vegas NV  matchcovers
Fremont Hotel Las Vegas, NV 1950's
The beautiful new Fremont Hotel and Casino
in the 1950's.
Fremont 1964
The Fremont had some great shows and entertainment in the 1950's and 60's
Fremont and Four Queens in Las Vegas in 1964
These playing cards were gifts
and not the cards used
in play at the Fremont.
These playing cards were gifts 
and not the cards used 
in play at the Fremont.
Some early matchcovers
from the Fremont.
This view is from INSIDE my room in the Fremont Hotel tower. It shows the outside of the Fremont Street Experience "Viva Vision" canopy that now covers the original casinos. This is not a view that normally shows up on a postcard! 
When I am in Las Vegas the Fremont is still one of my favorite places to stay.

My photo below shows what that giant metallic grid you see above becomes when the sun goes down!

It's the largest movie screen in the world!

Every hour on the hour the crowds leave the casinos for a different 10 minute show!
It's free and it's incredible!!
Fremont chip from 1956  N1643
This chip from my collection is one of the
first chips to hit the tables in 1956.
Fremont Hotel Las Vegas, NV
Fremont Hotel Las Vegas, NV
The Fremont had some great shows and entertainment in the 1950's and 60's including Mickey Rooney and Kay Starr.
Two views of the Fremont Hotel and the Four Queens taken 40 years apart.
Fremont Hotel Casino Las Vgeas in 1972 and 2012
On Sept. 25, 1958, the gaming control board granted operators of the Fremont in Las Vegas permits for emergency participation in the operation of the Horseshoe Club, pending completion of the purchase by the Fremont group of Joe Brown's interest in the club.
On Jan. 25, 1956  The Nevada State Gambling Control Board recommended approval of a state gambling license for 16 partners who planned to operate a casino in the new 8 story, $4,000,000, Fremont Hotel in downtown Las Vegas.

The hotel construction was financed by Louis Lurie, a San Francisco financier who invested over $2,000,00 in the project.

It was leased under a lease-purchase agreement to the casino operators who put up an additional $1,927,000 including a $300,000 bankroll.

The gaming board recommended that the license be issued subject to approval of a financial statement by the partners prior to its opening in March 1956, showing ability to meet all outstanding obligations and to operate on a sound basis.

The license applicants in March 1956 were:

Edward J. Barrick, 2 per cent, $100,000, Las Vegas gambler;
Ben Bingham, 2 per cent, $50,000, Temple City, Calif., contractor;
Bryant Burton, 4 ½  per cent, $27,500, Los Angeles attorney;
Marvin Cole, 8 ½  per cent, $100,000, New York advertising man;
Connie Hurley, 4 per cent, $100,000, Las Vegas gambler;
Harry H. Isaacs, 11 per cent, $425,000 Minneapolis industrialist:
Oliver M. Kahle, 4 per cent, $75,000, Las Vegas gambler;
Louis J. Lederer, 8 per cent, $70,000, Chicago, auto dealer and former Sands licensee;
Edward Levinson, 30 per cent, $270,000, Las Vegas gambler, former Sands partner, and his son,
Richard B. Levinson, 3 per cent, $30,000;
Wayne D. McAllister, 2 per cent, $15,000, Los Angeles architect;
Lee McRitchie, 8 per cent, $155,000, Elizabeth, N.J., dog racing operator;
Michael Shapiro, 6 per cent, $150,000, Las Vegas gambler and former licensee in several strip hotels;
Lester J. Sigelbaum, 3 per cent, $75,000, Miami lighting fixture dealer;
Edward Torres, 6 per cent, $125,-000, New York advertising man and produce company owner,
and Paul E. Weyerman, 3 per cent, $150,000, former Omaha. NE bookmaker.


Today’s slot machines use “TITO’s” or ticket in/ticket out. But before that system it was all coins and tokens. You needed something to carry those coins around from machine to machine and then to the cashier.  Originally customers used paper cups supplied by the casinos. Here’s an older example of a paper coin cup that has survived from the Fremont Hotel and Casino in downtown Las Vegas.
Today’s slot machines use “TITO’s” or ticket in/ticket out. Before that system it was all coins and tokens. You needed something to carry those coins around from machine to machine and then to the cashier. 

Originally customers used paper cups supplied by the casinos.

Here’s an older example of a paper coin cup that has survived from the Fremont Hotel and Casino in downtown Las Vegas.
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Based on a work at http://over50vegas.com/index.html.


This is a non-commercial, educational, hobby site. Images on this site are from our personal collection and from personal collections of fellow enthusiasts who have shared their scans with us.  Other images are noted by source with links to the original.  If you feel that any image used here has infringed upon fair use of an image you hold the copyright to, please contact us at the links above and it will be credited or removed at your request. 

Sources you might want to visit for more information include: 
Newspaper Archive    Newspapers.com   UNLV Digital Collection    UNLV Reno   Las Vegas Sun     mypubliclibrary.com  
TCR numbers are used by express permission of SSS Publishing publishers of The Chip Rack.

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